Thu. Aug 13th, 2020

20 thoughts on “Iran’s Olympic heroine flees from her home

  1. She is a traitor who used her fame to hurt her own country. Iran had been
    under siege for decades ever since the current govt toppled the Shah who
    was installed after toppling a democratically elected and popular Iranian govt.
    There was never a time when Iran was under so much threat and stress as
    in the last few days. What the European-Israelite in Palestine and their
    Western friends would have liked to do was do a shock&awe on Iran as
    they did to Iraq but they worried about the consequences. This woman
    could have relocated without announcing it and trying to make the Iranians
    still mourning the death of their general to look bad. Traitors are born
    everyday and she is no special.

  2. She is a traitor who used her fame to hurt her own country. Iran had been
    under siege for decades ever since the current govt toppled the Shah who
    was installed after toppling a democratically elected and popular Iranian govt.
    There was never a time when Iran was under so much threat and stress as
    in the last few days. What the European-Israelite in Palestine and their
    Western friends would have liked to do was do a shock&awe on Iran as
    they did to Iraq but they worried about the consequences. This woman
    could have relocated without announcing it and trying to make the Iranians
    still mourning the death of their general to look bad. Traitors are born
    everyday and she is no special.

  3. Key Events in the 1953 Coup

    World War II ends. Iran becomes a target of both pro-Western and pro-Soviet forces with regard to the country’s vast oil reserves.

    Feb. 5, 1949: Ruler of Iran Is Wounded Slightly by Two Bullets Fired by Assassin

    June 1950: General Ali Razmara becomes prime minister of Iran. Support grows for the nationalization of Iran’s oil industry.

    March 1951: Prime Minister Ali Razmara is assassinated.
    Nationalist Mohammed Mossadegh becomes prime minister and angers the British by wresting control of the oil industry.

    July 17, 1952: Due to growing friction between the shah and Mossadegh over oil, Mossadegh resigns. Ahmed Ghavam takes over as prime minister. Three days of rioting ensue.

    July 22, 1952: Under pressure, the Shah is forced to reappoint Mossadegh.

    March 1953: The C.I.A. begins drafting a plan to bring to power, through covert action, a government in Iran that would be preferred by the United States.

    April 16, 1953: A C.I.A. study entitled “Factors Involved in the Overthrow of Mossadegh” is completed. The study concludes that a coup in Iran is possible.

    May 13, 1953: C.I.A. and British intelligence officers meet in Nicosia, Cyprus, to draft plans for the coup. Meanwhile, the C.I.A.’s Tehran station is granted approval to launch a “grey propaganda” campaign to discredit the Mossadegh government.

    June 10, 1953: C.I.A. officers meet in Beirut for a final review of the coup plan.

    June 19, 1953: The final operation plan for the coup, agreed upon by both the C.I.A. and British intelligence, is submitted to the U.S. State Department and the Foreign Office in London.

    July 1, 1953: Britain’s prime minister gives final approval to the operational plan for the coup.

    July 11, 1953: President Eisenhower gives final approval to the operational plan for the coup.

    July 23, 1953: A British Foreign Office memorandum is presented to an Under Secretary of State, reassuring the U.S. that the British would be flexible on the issue of controlling oil in Iran.

    July 25, 1953: Under pressure from the C.I.A., Princess Ashraf, the Shah’s sister, flies to Tehran from France in order to convince the Shah to sign the royal decrees that would dismiss Mossadegh.

    “…should the Shah fail to go along with the U.S. representative or fail to produce the [legal] documents for General Zahedi, Zahedi would be informed that the United States would be ready to go ahead without the Shah’s active cooperation…” — C.I.A. Document, Appendix B, page 10

    July 29, 1953: The C.I.A. intensifies a propaganda effort, which included planting stories in major American newspapers, to weaken the Mossadegh government.

    Aug. 1, 1953: In a meeting with Gen. H. Norman Schwartzkopf, the Shah refuses to sign the C.I.A.-written royal decrees firing Mossadegh and naming Gen. Zahedi as the new prime minister of Iran.

    Aug. 4, 1953: Mossadegh, suspecting that British and American governments were plotting against him, holds a referendum calling for the Iranian parliament to be dissolved.

    Aug. 13, 1953: The shah signs a royal decrees dismissing Mossadegh. Word of the shah’s support for the coup spreads quickly in Iran.

    Aug. 15, 1953: The coup begins, but falters and then fails because Mossadegh received advanced warning of the plans. Zahedi goes into hiding.

    Aug. 16, 1953: The Shah flees to Baghdad.

    Aug. 17, 1953: Gen. Zahedi announces that he is the prime minister. To support this claim, C.I.A. agents disseminate a large quantity of photographs of the royal decrees dismissing Mossadegh and appointing Zahedi. The Shah announces that he indeed signed the decrees.

    Aug. 18, 1953: The C.I.A., discouraged by the failed coup, sends a message to Tehran ordering the operations against Mossadegh to be halted.

    Aug. 19, 1953: Several Tehran newspapers publish the Shah’s decrees. As a result, supporters of the Shah begin gathering in the streets, and another coup begins. Gen. Zahedi comes out of hiding to lead the movement. By the end of the day, the country is in the hands of Zahedi and members of the Mossadegh government are either in hiding or incarerated.

    “From the fact that certain actions provided for in the military plan failed to materialize … it was obvious that something had gone wrong.” — C.I.A. Document, Part VII, page 44

    1954: With Zahedi acting as prime minister and the pro-Shah army units in control, hundreds of National Front leaders, communist Tudah Party officers and political activists are arrested• The Anglo-Iranian Oil Company resumes operation.

    1954: Mossadegh’s minister of foreign affairs, Hossein Fatemi, is sentenced to death and executed.

    1954: The Anglo-Iranian Oil Company resumes operation.

    https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/library/world/mideast/041600iran-coup-timeline.html

  4. Since when is a religious figure such as the Muslim mullah benign when they encourage people to chant death to a neighbor or another human being?

    The real people aren’t religious zealots and they are people like westerners that proclaim the right to free expression without inciting hate. Meanwhile… the mullahs incite hate.

    Although I must tip my hat to the Iranian state for so quickly admitting their guilt in the downing of the Ukrainian airline killing some 176 people last week. It’s apparent to me that Iran is a bit more advanced in culture than the Russia which still denies its complicity in the downing of MH17 over Ukraine in 2014. Meanwhile all forensic studies have proven that Russia was behind that downing.

  5. The mullahs who rose to power when they overthrew the Shah who was installed in power by overthrowing an Iranian democracy?

  6. You write “At least Iran merely chants “Death to America.””

    “Merely”??

    That alone promotes terrorism upon innocent people.

    Then you wrote: “America by contrast actually mass murders people and reduces entire nations and regions to rubble and chaos.”

    Are you not even aware of the mass destruction that Russian bombing has done?? Are you not aware of hospitals and schools that have been destroyed along with the people that were in those neighborhoods?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/13/world/middleeast/russia-bombing-syrian-hospitals.html

  7. You are attacking the victim that has just now overthrown her oppressor… her own government.

  8. Because it’s dealing with the internal issues with the government. Not everyone plays the blame game.

  9. Anyone who is the least bit constructive,is a candidate to become a refugee from countries like Iran.

  10. NOW I know who Kimia Alizadeh is. God bless her freedom loving heart so that she can continue to inspire others to stand solidly on both feet unafraid and confident in their personal inner strength. Kind of reminds me of Daniel in the lion’s den for those of us who can only relate to Biblical stories.

  11. do these sanctions affect her dress code? what clothes should she wear according to you to show the effect of americas crippling sanctions?
    now she will enjoy the crippling efffects of the frisian freedom. thats all what matters. you can kiss our a$$^^

  12. Not at all. I very much respect the Iranian people and their culture. Have you ever read their poetry? I have.

    Right now what is stifling the Iranian people and their culture are the mullahs.

  13. Why would I miss anyone else’s choice of outfit. I prefer and support the freedom/right to choose what to wear. Don’t you?

  14. “She’s selfishly capitalizing on people sympathies at the expense of her beleaguered nation. That isn’t nice or benign. Neither are crippling sanctions.”

    as every nation dont give a f@ck about you this is very wise from her. the usa dont give a f@ck about you, germany dont give a f@ck about me. only i care for me. why should she act for an anonym entity. people that are running behind flags or ideologies are always ldiots. gunfood so to say.
    my grandfather didnt give a f@ck about adolf and his ideology. so we all enjoy now a good life in germany. traitors? might be, but ask adolfs true followers and believers. but this is difficult because they are all dead now.

    so she is now free and able to do what she want. and she dont want to be a puppet of ie lenna or helen. and she is also not the puppet of the usa or iran. she can now do her teakwondo like she wants and dont has to waste her time with counting zionist dna.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bF5xPeYS8vA

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